Live: [email protected] | PM Modi pays homage to Mahatma Gandhi at Rajghat

India honours Gandhi on his 150th birth anniversary

 

 

 

PM Modi, Sonia Gandhi pay homage to Gandhi at Rajghat

PM Narendra Modi pays tribute to Mahatma Gandhi at Raj Ghat

PM Narendra Modi pays tribute to Mahatma Gandhi at Raj Ghat
 
| Photo Credit: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi paid homage to Mahatma Gandhi at Rajghat on his 150th birth anniversary.

Former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Congress president Sonia Gandhi also paid floral tributes to the Father of Nation.

Former PM Dr. Manmohan Singh pays tribute to Gandhiji at Raj Ghat

Former PM Dr. Manmohan Singh pays tribute to Gandhiji at Raj Ghat  
| Photo Credit: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

 

Congress leader Sonia Gandhi pays tribute to Mahatma Gandhi at Raj Ghat

Congress leader Sonia Gandhi pays tribute to Mahatma Gandhi at Raj Ghat
 
| Photo Credit: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

 

Both the BJP and Congress have planned several events to mark the event.

Vice President Venkaiah Naidu pays tribute to Gandhiji at Raj Ghat

Vice President Venkaiah Naidu pays tribute to Gandhiji at Raj Ghat
 
| Photo Credit: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

 

– PTI

 

Mahatma Gandhi: An environmentalist by nature

The word “ecology” appears nowhere in Gandhiji’s writings, and he never spoke about environmental protection as such. Yet, as the Chipko Movement, the Narmada Bachao Andolan and in a very different context, the manifesto of the German Greens have shown, the impress of Gandhiji’s thinking on ecological movements has been felt widely.

Gandhiji was a practitioner of recycling decades before the idea caught on in the West, and he initiated perhaps the most far-reaching critiques of the ideas of consumption and that fetish of the economist called “growth”. Thus, in myriad ways, we can believe that he was a thinker with a profoundly ecological sensibility.

Read more

 

Recovering Gandhi’s religious vision

Gandhi was suspicious of many things modern, including modern Hinduism: a new, 19th century religion, sharply demarcated from others, and a fitting rival of Islam and Christianity. Why? Because he viewed himself as a sanatani, an adherent of a way of life that started long, long ago but, unlike the ancient that is dead and gone, continues to live today.

Central to this seemingly everlasting Hindu imagination is its deep plurality, reflected in its acceptance of the co-existence of three basic ethical forms: one dependent on multiple gods and goddesses, one on a single god, and one even entirely independent of god, gods and goddesses (truth-seeking). For Gandhi, this religio-philosophical plurality is the inevitable and healthy destiny of humankind. “There is endless variety in all religions” and “interminable religious differences,” he said. “Some go on a pilgrimage and bathe in the sacred river, others go to Mecca; some worship him in temples, others in mosques, some just bow their heads in reverence; some read the Vedas, others the Quran… some call themselves Hindus, others Muslims…” For Gandhi, there is not only diversity of religions but also diversity within them. “While I believe myself to be a Hindu, I know that I do not worship God in the same manner as any one or all of them.”

Read more

 

Source: Read Full Article